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brotoad:

my idea for a new disney world ride. please signal boost this so that this ride can be at disney world.
brotoad:

my idea for a new disney world ride. please signal boost this so that this ride can be at disney world.
brotoad:

my idea for a new disney world ride. please signal boost this so that this ride can be at disney world.
brotoad:

my idea for a new disney world ride. please signal boost this so that this ride can be at disney world.
brotoad:

my idea for a new disney world ride. please signal boost this so that this ride can be at disney world.
brotoad:

my idea for a new disney world ride. please signal boost this so that this ride can be at disney world.
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emosad420:

these god damn nerds are lucky dinosaurs don’t exist anymore. you gonna front up to a t-rex and tell him he dont exist? he’ll fuck you up dont even matter that he got tiny ass arms
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prostheticknowledge:

Programmable Materials
Project by Skylar Tibbits for MIT’s Self-Assembly Lab explores materials that can alter their shape under certain conditions, from carbon fiber and fabric to woodgrain:

Programmable Materials consist of material compositions that are designed to become highly dynamic in form and function, yet they are as cost-effective as traditional materials, easily fabricated and capable of flat-pack shipping and self-assembly.  These new materials include: self-transforming carbon fiber, printed wood grain, custom textile composites and other rubbers/plastics, which offer unprecedented capabilities including programmable actuation, sensing and self-transformation, from a simple material.
Nearly every industry has long desired smarter materials and robotic-like transformation from apparel, architecture, product design and manufacturing to aerospace and automotive industries. However, these capabilities have often required expensive, error-prone and complex electromechanical devices (motors, sensors, electronics), bulky components, power consumption (batteries or electricity) and difficult assembly processes. These constraints have made it difficult to efficiently produce dynamic systems, higher-performing machines and more adaptive products, until now. Our goal is true material robotics or robots without robots.

A couple of examples - here is a proof-of-concept adaptive airfoil which does not require any additional mechanical parts:

Here is a proof of concept demonstration of ‘programmable wood’:

More about this project can be found here
prostheticknowledge:

Programmable Materials
Project by Skylar Tibbits for MIT’s Self-Assembly Lab explores materials that can alter their shape under certain conditions, from carbon fiber and fabric to woodgrain:

Programmable Materials consist of material compositions that are designed to become highly dynamic in form and function, yet they are as cost-effective as traditional materials, easily fabricated and capable of flat-pack shipping and self-assembly.  These new materials include: self-transforming carbon fiber, printed wood grain, custom textile composites and other rubbers/plastics, which offer unprecedented capabilities including programmable actuation, sensing and self-transformation, from a simple material.
Nearly every industry has long desired smarter materials and robotic-like transformation from apparel, architecture, product design and manufacturing to aerospace and automotive industries. However, these capabilities have often required expensive, error-prone and complex electromechanical devices (motors, sensors, electronics), bulky components, power consumption (batteries or electricity) and difficult assembly processes. These constraints have made it difficult to efficiently produce dynamic systems, higher-performing machines and more adaptive products, until now. Our goal is true material robotics or robots without robots.

A couple of examples - here is a proof-of-concept adaptive airfoil which does not require any additional mechanical parts:

Here is a proof of concept demonstration of ‘programmable wood’:

More about this project can be found here
prostheticknowledge:

Programmable Materials
Project by Skylar Tibbits for MIT’s Self-Assembly Lab explores materials that can alter their shape under certain conditions, from carbon fiber and fabric to woodgrain:

Programmable Materials consist of material compositions that are designed to become highly dynamic in form and function, yet they are as cost-effective as traditional materials, easily fabricated and capable of flat-pack shipping and self-assembly.  These new materials include: self-transforming carbon fiber, printed wood grain, custom textile composites and other rubbers/plastics, which offer unprecedented capabilities including programmable actuation, sensing and self-transformation, from a simple material.
Nearly every industry has long desired smarter materials and robotic-like transformation from apparel, architecture, product design and manufacturing to aerospace and automotive industries. However, these capabilities have often required expensive, error-prone and complex electromechanical devices (motors, sensors, electronics), bulky components, power consumption (batteries or electricity) and difficult assembly processes. These constraints have made it difficult to efficiently produce dynamic systems, higher-performing machines and more adaptive products, until now. Our goal is true material robotics or robots without robots.

A couple of examples - here is a proof-of-concept adaptive airfoil which does not require any additional mechanical parts:

Here is a proof of concept demonstration of ‘programmable wood’:

More about this project can be found here
prostheticknowledge:

Programmable Materials
Project by Skylar Tibbits for MIT’s Self-Assembly Lab explores materials that can alter their shape under certain conditions, from carbon fiber and fabric to woodgrain:

Programmable Materials consist of material compositions that are designed to become highly dynamic in form and function, yet they are as cost-effective as traditional materials, easily fabricated and capable of flat-pack shipping and self-assembly.  These new materials include: self-transforming carbon fiber, printed wood grain, custom textile composites and other rubbers/plastics, which offer unprecedented capabilities including programmable actuation, sensing and self-transformation, from a simple material.
Nearly every industry has long desired smarter materials and robotic-like transformation from apparel, architecture, product design and manufacturing to aerospace and automotive industries. However, these capabilities have often required expensive, error-prone and complex electromechanical devices (motors, sensors, electronics), bulky components, power consumption (batteries or electricity) and difficult assembly processes. These constraints have made it difficult to efficiently produce dynamic systems, higher-performing machines and more adaptive products, until now. Our goal is true material robotics or robots without robots.

A couple of examples - here is a proof-of-concept adaptive airfoil which does not require any additional mechanical parts:

Here is a proof of concept demonstration of ‘programmable wood’:

More about this project can be found here
prostheticknowledge:

Programmable Materials
Project by Skylar Tibbits for MIT’s Self-Assembly Lab explores materials that can alter their shape under certain conditions, from carbon fiber and fabric to woodgrain:

Programmable Materials consist of material compositions that are designed to become highly dynamic in form and function, yet they are as cost-effective as traditional materials, easily fabricated and capable of flat-pack shipping and self-assembly.  These new materials include: self-transforming carbon fiber, printed wood grain, custom textile composites and other rubbers/plastics, which offer unprecedented capabilities including programmable actuation, sensing and self-transformation, from a simple material.
Nearly every industry has long desired smarter materials and robotic-like transformation from apparel, architecture, product design and manufacturing to aerospace and automotive industries. However, these capabilities have often required expensive, error-prone and complex electromechanical devices (motors, sensors, electronics), bulky components, power consumption (batteries or electricity) and difficult assembly processes. These constraints have made it difficult to efficiently produce dynamic systems, higher-performing machines and more adaptive products, until now. Our goal is true material robotics or robots without robots.

A couple of examples - here is a proof-of-concept adaptive airfoil which does not require any additional mechanical parts:

Here is a proof of concept demonstration of ‘programmable wood’:

More about this project can be found here
prostheticknowledge:

Programmable Materials
Project by Skylar Tibbits for MIT’s Self-Assembly Lab explores materials that can alter their shape under certain conditions, from carbon fiber and fabric to woodgrain:

Programmable Materials consist of material compositions that are designed to become highly dynamic in form and function, yet they are as cost-effective as traditional materials, easily fabricated and capable of flat-pack shipping and self-assembly.  These new materials include: self-transforming carbon fiber, printed wood grain, custom textile composites and other rubbers/plastics, which offer unprecedented capabilities including programmable actuation, sensing and self-transformation, from a simple material.
Nearly every industry has long desired smarter materials and robotic-like transformation from apparel, architecture, product design and manufacturing to aerospace and automotive industries. However, these capabilities have often required expensive, error-prone and complex electromechanical devices (motors, sensors, electronics), bulky components, power consumption (batteries or electricity) and difficult assembly processes. These constraints have made it difficult to efficiently produce dynamic systems, higher-performing machines and more adaptive products, until now. Our goal is true material robotics or robots without robots.

A couple of examples - here is a proof-of-concept adaptive airfoil which does not require any additional mechanical parts:

Here is a proof of concept demonstration of ‘programmable wood’:

More about this project can be found here
prostheticknowledge:

Programmable Materials
Project by Skylar Tibbits for MIT’s Self-Assembly Lab explores materials that can alter their shape under certain conditions, from carbon fiber and fabric to woodgrain:

Programmable Materials consist of material compositions that are designed to become highly dynamic in form and function, yet they are as cost-effective as traditional materials, easily fabricated and capable of flat-pack shipping and self-assembly.  These new materials include: self-transforming carbon fiber, printed wood grain, custom textile composites and other rubbers/plastics, which offer unprecedented capabilities including programmable actuation, sensing and self-transformation, from a simple material.
Nearly every industry has long desired smarter materials and robotic-like transformation from apparel, architecture, product design and manufacturing to aerospace and automotive industries. However, these capabilities have often required expensive, error-prone and complex electromechanical devices (motors, sensors, electronics), bulky components, power consumption (batteries or electricity) and difficult assembly processes. These constraints have made it difficult to efficiently produce dynamic systems, higher-performing machines and more adaptive products, until now. Our goal is true material robotics or robots without robots.

A couple of examples - here is a proof-of-concept adaptive airfoil which does not require any additional mechanical parts:

Here is a proof of concept demonstration of ‘programmable wood’:

More about this project can be found here
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prasm:

freakinasheet:

James and the Giant Peach (1996)

YOU’RE FIRED
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nybg:

flavorpill:

Stunning Photos of the World’s Oldest Living Organisms 

Plants are truly remarkable. To think these guys have been plucking along, silent spectators to the passing millenia. ~LM
nybg:

flavorpill:

Stunning Photos of the World’s Oldest Living Organisms 

Plants are truly remarkable. To think these guys have been plucking along, silent spectators to the passing millenia. ~LM
nybg:

flavorpill:

Stunning Photos of the World’s Oldest Living Organisms 

Plants are truly remarkable. To think these guys have been plucking along, silent spectators to the passing millenia. ~LM
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gauntapostle:

mysticalmalik:

DAAYMN

Oil: Top three suppliers of oil to the US are Canada, Saudi Arabia, and Mexico. We also import oil from Venezuela, Iraq, Colombia, Angola, Brazil, Ecuador, Kuwait, and Russia, and obtain oil within America from California, Texas, and Alaska, among other states. We can do without oil from Africa if needed.
Gold: The top four sources of gold in the world are China, Australia, United States, and Russia. South Africa is #5 on the list and Ghana is #10, but 6-9 are Peru, Canada, Indonesia, and Uzbekistan. We can do without gold from Africa if needed.
Diamonds: True, approximately 65% of the world’s diamonds come from Africa. The remaining percentage, 35%, comes mostly from Australia, Canada, and Russia. The diamond trade would certainly suffer if goods were not allowed to be exported from Africa, although it should be noted that diamond exporters in Australia, Canada, and Russia would benefit from the resulting immense price inflation due to scarcity. I believe that the main effect of this would be A, people buying used diamonds more, and B, other jewels, gems, and precious stones becoming more popular than diamonds. Diamond tools are used to process Carbide alloy, hard or abrasive non-metallic materials (for example, stone, concrete, asphalt, glass, ceramics, gem stone and semiconductor materials), non-ferrous metals such as aluminum, copper and their alloys, and some soft but tough materials such as rubber and resin. However, enough diamonds are already in circulation that I do not believe a temporary embargo on diamonds from Africa would significantly affect industries using these materials.
Rubber: The top sources of rubber used by the US are China, Indonesia, Thailand, Vietnam, Mexico, Korea, Italy, Brazil, Taiwan, and the Dominican Republic. No country in Africa is among even the top 25 nations that export rubber to the US. An embargo on rubber exported from Africa will have little to no effect on the US economy, or the world economy outside of Africa, as most rubber is produced in South America and Asia.
Cocoa: Approximately 67% of the world’s cocoa is produced in Africa. The other 33% is produced in South America and Asia. This is probably the industry that would suffer the most from an embargo on exports from Africa, but let’s be honest- we can live without cocoa. Obesity is enough of a problem today that perhaps a scarcity of chocolate may even help.
Palm Oil: Indonesia is the largest producer of palm oil in the world, followed by Malaysia; the two countries account for 85% of the world’s palm oil production. Nigeria is the third largest producer of palm oil, followed by Thailand and Colombia. The palm oil industry is responsible for deforestation of many of Earth’s rainforests, and many believe it should be reformed if not shut down. The palm oil industry is also tied to child slave labor, and palm oil is just as bad for you as corn syrup. So not only is Africa not a large enough source of palm oil to significantly harm the industry on a global scale if there was an embargo, it may be ethically responsible to place an embargo on all palm oil anyways.
Iron Ore: The top five producers of iron ore in the world are China, Australia, Brazil, India, and Russia. Only one African country, South Africa is even in the top ten, and it produces only 2.3% of the world’s iron ore. Very little of the world’s iron ore comes from Africa, and an embargo on African iron ore would not affect the US economy or global economy outside of Africa in the slightest. I’m not certain how large an impact it would have on Africa’s economy, at that.
In closing, while I’m honestly not in favor of banning all flights from Africa and think it’s a stupid panic response that would be too costly and difficult to implement given the meager risk it represents, the statements in the tweet pictured above are very inaccurate. Africa does not have the power to shut down the world economy, and even if it did this response is petty and childish, and the exportation of goods from Africa has nothing to do with the spread of Ebola, given it requires infected people or animals or infected bodily fluids to actually spread, and is not spread by air or water, or even by food unless that food is the uncooked meat of wild animals that were infected with the Ebola virus.